Ming WONG

 
In Love for the Mood  (2009 ) , video still, courtesy of the artist, carlier | gebauer and Vitamin Creative Space

In Love for the Mood (2009), video still, courtesy of the artist, carlier | gebauer and Vitamin Creative Space

 

In Love for the Mood

2009, video installation, 4’

Originally commissioned for the 53rd Venice Biennale for the artist’s solo exhibition Life of Imitation at the Singapore Pavilion, this work is inspired by Hong Kong filmmaker Wong Kar- Wai’s meditation on love and infidelity set in Hong Kong in the 1960s, In the Mood for Love (2000). A Caucasian actress plays both the leading man and woman, attempting to deliver her lines in Cantonese, by repeating after the artist/director’s off-screen voice.

 
Windows on the World (Part 1)  (2014), video still, courtesy of the artist, carlier | gebauer and Vitamin Creative Space

Windows on the World (Part 1) (2014), video still, courtesy of the artist, carlier | gebauer and Vitamin Creative Space

 

Windows on the World (Part 1)

2014, single-channel video, 3’20”

As part of Wong’s long-term endeavor on the unconscious relationships between sci-fi and Cantonese opera, the structure built in the exhibition departs from the oceanic landscape appearing in Tarkovsky’s Solaris (1972) and its infinite horizon of islets. In this work, the vortexes of space conquest collide with the vortex of antiquity, becoming a site where a Chinese sci-fi plot is imagined.

 

Ming WONG

Born 1971 in Singapore; lives and works in Berlin

Ming WONG builds layers of cinematic language, social structure, identity and introspection through his re-telling of world cinema and popular culture in his videos, installations and performances. With imperfect translations and reenactments, he casts an actor (often himself) as every character in a story. Wong attempts to unravel ideas of ‘authenticity’, ‘originality’and the ‘other’, with reference to the act of human performativity. He looks into how culture, gender and identity are constructed, reproduced and circulated, as well as how it all feeds into the politics of representation. Though untrained as an actor, he has embarked on an artistic practice that is at once highly influenced by cinema and is in constant dialogue with measures of performativity, gender, and difference. Recent projects have become more interdisciplinary, incorporating performance and installation to enrich his exploration of cultural artefacts from around the world.